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(Source: dailyscranton, via onlylolgifs)

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rtamerica:

Clapper admits NSA should have been ‘transparent from the outset’ on surveillance
The Director of National Intelligence has admitted that, in hindsight, the US intelligence community would have been smarter to disclose some details about how telephone records belonging to millions of Americans have been collected for years.
Perhaps more than any other Obama administration official, James Clapper has been the target of the most criticism, sarcasm, and outright fury since Edward Snowden leaked a trove of classified National Security Agency documents. He has staunchly defended the government’s interpretation of section 215 of the Patriot Act, under which it argues that secret collection of phone data is legal.
Now, in an exclusive interview with The Daily Beast, Clapper appears to have admitted that many of the problems currently plaguing intelligence community are self-inflicted and could have been avoided.

rtamerica:

Clapper admits NSA should have been ‘transparent from the outset’ on surveillance

The Director of National Intelligence has admitted that, in hindsight, the US intelligence community would have been smarter to disclose some details about how telephone records belonging to millions of Americans have been collected for years.

Perhaps more than any other Obama administration official, James Clapper has been the target of the most criticism, sarcasm, and outright fury since Edward Snowden leaked a trove of classified National Security Agency documents. He has staunchly defended the government’s interpretation of section 215 of the Patriot Act, under which it argues that secret collection of phone data is legal.

Now, in an exclusive interview with The Daily Beast, Clapper appears to have admitted that many of the problems currently plaguing intelligence community are self-inflicted and could have been avoided.

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rtamerica:

Ohio National Guard portrayed gun rights supporters as domestic terrorists during drill
Questions are being raised about the Ohio National Guard after internal documents revealed that the agency conducted a training drill last year in which Second Amendment advocates were portrayed as domestic terrorists.
WSAZ News reported out of Portsmouth, Ohio early last year that a mock disaster had been staged in order to see first responders from Scioto County and the Ohio Army National Guard’s Fifty-Second Civil Support Unit would react to a make-believe scenario in which school officials plotted to use chemical, biological and radiological agents against members of the community.

rtamerica:

Ohio National Guard portrayed gun rights supporters as domestic terrorists during drill

Questions are being raised about the Ohio National Guard after internal documents revealed that the agency conducted a training drill last year in which Second Amendment advocates were portrayed as domestic terrorists.

WSAZ News reported out of Portsmouth, Ohio early last year that a mock disaster had been staged in order to see first responders from Scioto County and the Ohio Army National Guard’s Fifty-Second Civil Support Unit would react to a make-believe scenario in which school officials plotted to use chemical, biological and radiological agents against members of the community.

theatlantic:

The NSA ‘Probably’ Collects Data on Congress’s Phone Calls

With the NSA, getting to the truth takes time. At first, there are mere hints that the agency is spying in some way that would be controversial. Gradually, the public gets circumstantial evidence. The truth becomes obvious to the small percentage of Americans who are paying close attention, but there’s no way to prove it.
Finally, the proof arrives! But even though the mere prospect used to be alarming, confirmation is now treated as no big deal: “Oh, everybody knew that already.” 
We’re having one of those moments.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

The NSA ‘Probably’ Collects Data on Congress’s Phone Calls

With the NSA, getting to the truth takes time. At first, there are mere hints that the agency is spying in some way that would be controversial. Gradually, the public gets circumstantial evidence. The truth becomes obvious to the small percentage of Americans who are paying close attention, but there’s no way to prove it.

Finally, the proof arrives! But even though the mere prospect used to be alarming, confirmation is now treated as no big deal: “Oh, everybody knew that already.” 

We’re having one of those moments.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

rtamerica:

Justice Dept. says Bank of America should be fined $2.1 billion for mortgage fraud
The United States government is now seeking $2.1 billion in fines from Bank of America for selling fraudulent loans that precipitated the Great Recession, more than double the amount it initially sought last year.
Back in November, the Department of Justice asked a US district judge to levy about $863 million in penalties on Bank of America after a jury found the financial giant guilty of committing fraud.

rtamerica:

Justice Dept. says Bank of America should be fined $2.1 billion for mortgage fraud

The United States government is now seeking $2.1 billion in fines from Bank of America for selling fraudulent loans that precipitated the Great Recession, more than double the amount it initially sought last year.

Back in November, the Department of Justice asked a US district judge to levy about $863 million in penalties on Bank of America after a jury found the financial giant guilty of committing fraud.

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theatlantic:

How Dianne Feinstein Exaggerates Global Terrorism

A lesson in how to hype an unquantifiable threat with bogus numbers.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

How Dianne Feinstein Exaggerates Global Terrorism

A lesson in how to hype an unquantifiable threat with bogus numbers.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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rtamerica:

West Virginia official says residents are breathing cancer-causing agent after chemical spill
A West Virginia state official told legislators on Wednesday that he “can guarantee” some residents are breathing in a cancer-causing substance due to the chemical spill that occurred earlier in January.
In a recent meeting with a state legislative committee on water resources, Scott Simonton of the West Virginia Environmental Quality Board said that his tests have detected formaldehyde in water samples contaminated by the recent Elk River chemical spill.

rtamerica:

West Virginia official says residents are breathing cancer-causing agent after chemical spill

A West Virginia state official told legislators on Wednesday that he “can guarantee” some residents are breathing in a cancer-causing substance due to the chemical spill that occurred earlier in January.

In a recent meeting with a state legislative committee on water resources, Scott Simonton of the West Virginia Environmental Quality Board said that his tests have detected formaldehyde in water samples contaminated by the recent Elk River chemical spill.

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rtamerica:

San Jose looks to tap into residents’ private surveillance cameras for police use
A new proposal in the San Jose, California City Council would allow residents to voluntarily offer police access to their private video surveillance camera recordings. Authorities say the program would only be used for investigatory purposes.
The measure, introduced last week by Councilman Sam Liccardo, would require San Jose to “create and maintain a database that will enable residents to voluntarily identify their video surveillance equipment, and location of the camera view, by use of simple on-line registration.”
In the event of a crime or other police investigation, law enforcement would be able to tap into registered cameras in a pertinent area, saving police time and effort in a given search, Liccardo said of the proposal memorandum

rtamerica:

San Jose looks to tap into residents’ private surveillance cameras for police use

A new proposal in the San Jose, California City Council would allow residents to voluntarily offer police access to their private video surveillance camera recordings. Authorities say the program would only be used for investigatory purposes.

The measure, introduced last week by Councilman Sam Liccardo, would require San Jose to “create and maintain a database that will enable residents to voluntarily identify their video surveillance equipment, and location of the camera view, by use of simple on-line registration.”

In the event of a crime or other police investigation, law enforcement would be able to tap into registered cameras in a pertinent area, saving police time and effort in a given search, Liccardo said of the proposal memorandum

atheistjack:

via Exposing the Institutional Church
He did too. It’s in the bible.

atheistjack:

via Exposing the Institutional Church

He did too. It’s in the bible.

(via friendlyatheist)

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Blogs like Naked Capitalism Depend on Net Neutrality, So ISPs Should Be Common Carriers (or Their Pipes Turned Into Public Utilities)

Brian Fung: The D.C. Circuit court has struck down net neutrality. What does that mean for consumers [citizens]?

Tim Wu: It leaves the Internet in completely uncharted territory. There’s never been a situation where providers can block whatever they want. For example, it means AT&T can block people from reaching T-Mobile’s customer service site if it wanted. They can do whatever they want.

(Source: azspot)

(Source: memewhore)

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rtamerica:

Republicans vote to end NSA bulk phone metadata surveillance program
The Republican National Committee has passed a resolution pushing conservative lawmakers to put an end to the National Security Agency’s blanket surveillance of American citizens’ phone records.
The resolution also calls for an investigation of the NSA’s metadata collection practices, which it labeled a “gross infringement” of the rights of US citizens. Under Section 215 of the Patriot Act, the NSA has been authorized to collect and store the records of nearly all domestic phone calls – the phone numbers involved and duration of the calls, but not the content of the conversations themselves.

rtamerica:

Republicans vote to end NSA bulk phone metadata surveillance program

The Republican National Committee has passed a resolution pushing conservative lawmakers to put an end to the National Security Agency’s blanket surveillance of American citizens’ phone records.

The resolution also calls for an investigation of the NSA’s metadata collection practices, which it labeled a “gross infringement” of the rights of US citizens. Under Section 215 of the Patriot Act, the NSA has been authorized to collect and store the records of nearly all domestic phone calls – the phone numbers involved and duration of the calls, but not the content of the conversations themselves.

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rtamerica:

Burglars who robbed the FBI finally come forward after 42 years
Almost 43 years after the fact, a group of Vietnam War-era activists now admit to breaking into a Federal Bureau of Investigation office in the early ’70s and taking documents that exposed illegal tactics used by the FBI against Americans.
The identities of those in the so-called Citizens’ Committee to Investigate the FBI had been unknown to the public for more than four decades. Five of those eight individuals are named in a book published this Tuesday by Washington Post reporter Betty Medsger, however, and for the first time some of them are finally starting to speak up about an incident that helped turn the FBI on its ear and end the questionable and often unlawful operations the bureau had been waging against anti-war activists and others from the far-left deemed “radical” by the United States government.

rtamerica:

Burglars who robbed the FBI finally come forward after 42 years

Almost 43 years after the fact, a group of Vietnam War-era activists now admit to breaking into a Federal Bureau of Investigation office in the early ’70s and taking documents that exposed illegal tactics used by the FBI against Americans.

The identities of those in the so-called Citizens’ Committee to Investigate the FBI had been unknown to the public for more than four decades. Five of those eight individuals are named in a book published this Tuesday by Washington Post reporter Betty Medsger, however, and for the first time some of them are finally starting to speak up about an incident that helped turn the FBI on its ear and end the questionable and often unlawful operations the bureau had been waging against anti-war activists and others from the far-left deemed “radical” by the United States government.

*9
Steep Penalties Taken in Stride by JPMorgan Chase
By PETER EAVIS, nytimes.com
To set­tle a bar­rage of gov­ern­ment legal actions over the last year, JPMor­gan Chase has agreed to penal­ties that now total $20 bil­lion, a sum that could cover the annu­al edu­ca­tion bud­get of New York City or finance the Yan­kees’ pay­roll…

Steep Penalties Taken in Stride by JPMorgan Chase
By PETER EAVIS, nytimes.com

To set­tle a bar­rage of gov­ern­ment legal actions over the last year, JPMor­gan Chase has agreed to penal­ties that now total $20 bil­lion, a sum that could cover the annu­al edu­ca­tion bud­get of New York City or finance the Yan­kees’ pay­roll…

(Source: quotingthecrisis)

*79
theatlantic:

Counterterrorism and the Totalitarian Temptation

Through no fault of any individual, the logic of counterterrorism verges toward totalitarianism. National-security officials can keep us safe from a surprise attack by the Russians or Chinese by keeping tabs on a small number of foreign elites. Asking them to keep us safe from any terrorist attack is a radically different proposition.  
Thus the dangers of a national-security state focused on terrorism.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

Counterterrorism and the Totalitarian Temptation

Through no fault of any individual, the logic of counterterrorism verges toward totalitarianism. National-security officials can keep us safe from a surprise attack by the Russians or Chinese by keeping tabs on a small number of foreign elites. Asking them to keep us safe from any terrorist attack is a radically different proposition.  

Thus the dangers of a national-security state focused on terrorism.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]